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4 edition of Foliage dynamics and tree damage components of the western spruce budworm modeling system found in the catalog.

Foliage dynamics and tree damage components of the western spruce budworm modeling system

by Nicholas L. Crookston

  • 322 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station in Ogden, UT (324 25th Street, Ogden 84401) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Western spruce budworm -- Computer simulation

  • Edition Notes

    StatementNicholas L. Crookston
    SeriesGeneral technical report INT -- 282
    ContributionsIntermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination40 p. :
    Number of Pages40
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13614081M

      Variation exists within many natural plant populations in traits that are likely to confer resistance to insects, including trees. Scientists are evaluating the role of 10 potential mechanisms of Douglas-fir resistance to damage from the western spruce budworm, the most important forest defoliator in western North America. Spatiotemporal dynamics of recent mountain pine beetle and western spruce budworm outbreaks across the Pacific Northwest Region, USA Garrett W. Meigsa,⇑, Robert E. Kennedyb, Andrew N. Grayc, Matthew J. Gregorya a Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Richardson Hall, Corvallis, OR , USA bDepartment of Earth and Environment, Boston .

    Abstract. Conifer-feeding budworms in the genus Choristoneura are eruptive species that periodically defoliate conifer forests in North America, causing growth loss and, ultimately, tree mortality. These impacts create the need for management interventions. Emerging trends in forestry require a holistic approach that considers the implications of budworm management within an ecosystem context. The spruce budworm crawls upon and consumes the leaves of coniferous trees. Excessive consumption can damage and kill the host. The budworms themselves are eaten primarily by birds, who eat many other insects as well. The budworms prefer larger trees. A key factor in determining the spruce budworm population is the leaf surface area per tree.

      In , western spruce budworm activity was highly apparent in Douglas-fir and grand fir forests of the eastern slope of the Cascade Mountains north of I and across parts of northeastern Washington. Many people noticed defoliated branch tips and tree tops for the first time as an ongoing outbreak spread to include their land or. The spruce budworm has caused more damage to Nova Scotian softwood forests than any other insect. Overmature balsam fir is the preferred host and acts as a flash point for rapid population buildup. Populations tend to increase steadily and spread to younger trees. Feeding takes place on the top third of the tree on new shoots.


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Foliage dynamics and tree damage components of the western spruce budworm modeling system by Nicholas L. Crookston Download PDF EPUB FB2

Foliage dynamics and tree damage components of the western spruce budworm modeling system. Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

Foliage dynamics and tree damage components of the western spruce budworm modeling system. Ogden, Utah: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File.

Foliage Dynamics and Tree Damage Components of the Western Spruce Budworm Modeling System,General Technical Report, INT 40 pages with illustrations. [Crookston, N. L.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Foliage Dynamics and Tree Damage Components of the Western Spruce Budworm Modeling System,General Technical ReportAuthor: N. Crookston. Western spruce budworm is the most widely distributed forest defoliator in western North America.

Budworms have a one-year life cycle and are actually a small moth at full maturity. Here in the West, there can be severe infestations in healthy Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce. with the western spruce budworm.

Often budworm larvae feed on and seri-ously damage coniferous trees that are planted as ornamentals, such as Norway spruce (Picea Abies (L.) Karst.), and Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Damage Cones and seeds.—In addition to foliage, budworm larvae feed heavily on staminate flowers and developingFile Size: KB.

The western spruce budworm model: structure and content. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Serv-ice, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 70 p. The Budworm Model predicts the amounts of foliage destroyed annually by the west-ern spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman, in a forest stand.

The. The spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive native insects in the northern spruce and fir forests of the Eastern United States and of the time, the number of budworms remains at a low level.

However, every forty years or so, the population of budworms explodes to huge numbers, devastating the forest and destroying many trees, before dropping back. Budworm outbreaks may be sustained for 25 years or more. Host trees: Primarily Douglas-fir, with other tree species such as the true firs, larch and to a lesser degree, spruce, also impacted by the western spruce budworm.

Description and life cycle: The western. The spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.) (Lepidoptera: Tor­ tricidae), is native to eastern Canada and does not occur elsewhere. There has been knowledge of its behavior since We will first give the life cycle of a spruce budworm since we need to know at what stage(s) they will be affected by predators and/or insecticides.

TheFile Size: KB. generally known about predators of the spruce budworm. This review is restricted largely to predators of Choristoneura fumiferana, though reference is made to the jack pine budworm (C pinus Freeman) and the western spruce budworm (C occiden- talis Freeman).

We have taken the life-table approach, presenting what is known. The western spruce budworm is a damaging defoliator in British Columbia.

Budworm feeding damage includes killing of mined buds by early-instar larvae and stripping of the current year's foliage primarily in the upper crown by mid- to late-instar larvae. Budworms often consume only parts of needles and chew them off at their bases.

Reduce Damage From Western Spruce Budworm by Lawrence E. Stipe' Introduction The western spruce budworm has an annual life cycle of four stages—egg, larva, pupa, and adult (moths).

The stages, damage caused by budworm, and host species are described and illustrated in Forest Pest Leaflet 53 by Fellin and Dewey (). Western spruce budworm moth Western spruce budworm moths mate and lay eggs in late July-August. The female deposits overlapping, shingle-like egg masses on the underside of foliage on large, overstory Douglas-fir trees.

Up to eggs may be laid by each female. The egg masses are bright green when laid, and translucent white when empty. Eastern spruce budworm feeds mainly on balsam fir and white spruce, and to a lesser extent on red spruce and black spruce. Trees usually die after four or five consecutive years of severe loss of all or most leaves.

Quick facts. Outbreak cycles of. The Budworm Model simulates the population dynamics of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) to predict defoliation caused by budworms.

Ecological Modelling and Management of Spruce Budworm Infested Fir-Spruce Forests of New model which described the spatial and temporal dynamics of the spruce budworm and forest on about two-thirds of New Brunswick.

Tree age distribution Tree size Stand volume Dry weight of tree biomass components Foliage weight Number of stems Stand Cited by: The spruce budworm and forest: a qualitative comparison of ODE and Boolean models three-variable system based upon the dynamics of the budworm.

the foliage due to damage caused by the. Abstract. Understanding the dynamics of spruce budworm population is very important for the protection of spruce and balsam fir trees of North American forests, and a full understanding of the dynamics requires careful consideration of the individual physiological structures that is essential for outbreak by: 3.

A classical example for the implications of catastrophes for ecosystem management is spruce budworm dynamics. Spruce budworm is a caterpillar that feeds on spruce and fir forests in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada.

For many years, population Cited by: 1. Eastern spruce budworm damage to new foliage of white spruce. Budworm feeding damage is first noticed on outer branch shoots in the upper crowns of spruce and fir trees. Partially eaten needles are webbed onto branch tips and turn a reddish-brown color.

Long-term damage of budworm defoliation can result in top kill in 2 to 3 years for balsam. The western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis, is the most widely distributed and destructive forest defoliator in western North the Rockies, they most commonly infest Douglas-fir and white fir.

Occasionally, they also attack Engelmann spruce, blue spruce and sub-alpine fir.The spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, Clem., is the most significant defoliating pest of boreal balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) and spruce (Picea sp.) in North America. Historically, spruce budworm outbreaks have been managed via a reactive, foliage protection approach focused on keeping trees alive rather than stopping the outbreak.Balsam fir and white spruce are the preferred host species of the spruce budworm.

Red, black and Colorado spruce are also suitable host trees. On occasion, tamarack, pine, and hemlock may be fed upon. In Saskatchewan, spruce budworm feeds on white spruce, balsam fir and to a lesser extent black spruce, as well as the introduced Colorado Size: KB.